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Know Your Rights When Interacting With The Police

It is critical to understand your rights when interacting with law enforcement officers in any state, including Arizona. Speak with a skilled attorney for the most up-to-date information. In Arizona, you have the following rights when dealing with the police:

Right to Remain Silent

You have the right to remain silent to prevent self-incrimination under the Fifth Amendment to the US Constitution. This right can be exercised at any point during a contact with law enforcement.

Miranda Rights

The police should read you your Miranda rights upon your arrest. This includes the right to remain silent and the right to an attorney. Be careful because anything you say can be used against you in court.

Right to an Attorney

You have the right to counsel under the Sixth Amendment if you’re charged with a crime that could lead to imprisonment. If you cannot afford to hire a private attorney, one will be provided for you.

Rights to Refuse Search and Seizure Protections

You are protected from unreasonable searches and seizures under the Fourth Amendment. With a few exceptions, police generally require a warrant or probable cause to search your property. You have the right to refuse police requests to search your property without a warrant. If they insist, it’s best not to physically resist and instead to voice your opposition for the record.

Right to Refuse Field Sobriety Tests

You have the right to decline field sobriety testing in Arizona. However, refusal of a breath, blood, or urine test when suspected of DUI in Arizona can result in a license suspension.

Right to a Fair Trial

If you are accused with a crime, you have the right to a speedy, public trial by an impartial jury. You have the right to confront witnesses and to be represented by counsel.

Right to Record Police

It is generally permissible to record police officers in public as long as you do not interfere with their duties. However, always double-check local laws and regulations.

Seek counsel from a competent lawyer in your state. Remember, even though you have these rights, you must always be respectful and calm while interacting with police officers.

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